Newly Found in the Wild: Australian Finger Lime

Citrus australasica, the Australian Finger Lime is a sub tropical small tree/large bush recently found in the wilderness of Australia. Had many of the same characteristics of Mexican key limes with their thorns and small leaves. Typically found in the under story, but can tolerate direct full sun it produces a 1 to 3 inch fruit resembling a finger, so they say. I think they look like nothing else seen before unless you have imagined an elongated/stretched out lemon or lime and smells like sweet limes, bringing me memories of tropical skittles candies.
Definitely interesting and another reason to conserve, research and pass along knowledge of what exists and what hasn't yet been found on our Earth.
Our tree has naturally aborted singe of its fruit a bit early in the season. The reason is probably either too much fruit at such an early age (3-4 years old grafted) or the fact that it was getting so much sun (8-9 hours) in its previous location. More attention to its watering schedule and relocation will help support a successful harvest when the rest of the fruits fully ripen.
Check out the taste and feel of the popping caviar style vesicles on the Australian Fingerlime fruit. All Thanks to Mother Nature.

Newly Found in the Wild: Australian Finger Lime

Citrus australasica, the Australian Finger Lime is a sub tropical small tree/large bush recently found in the wilderness of Australia. Had many of the same characteristics of Mexican key limes with their thorns and small leaves. Typically found in the under story, but can tolerate direct full sun it produces a 1 to 3 inch fruit resembling a finger, so they say. I think they look like nothing else seen before unless you have imagined an elongated/stretched out lemon or lime and smells like sweet limes, bringing me memories of tropical skittles candies.
Definitely interesting and another reason to conserve, research and pass along knowledge of what exists and what hasn't yet been found on our Earth.
Our tree has naturally aborted singe of its fruit a bit early in the season. The reason is probably either too much fruit at such an early age (3-4 years old grafted) or the fact that it was getting so much sun (8-9 hours) in its previous location. More attention to its watering schedule and relocation will help support a successful harvest when the rest of the fruits fully ripen.
Check out the taste and feel of the popping caviar style vesicles on the Australian Fingerlime fruit. All Thanks to Mother Nature.